Contact Senators NOW about election security

A coalition of national pro-democracy groups is calling for a national day of action for election security. Wisconsin voters need to respond. On or before Tuesday, Sept. 17 contact our two senators to let them know Americans deserve secure elections! Important legislation is stalled in the US Senate, and the senators need to MOVE.

Here is Ron Johnson’s contact page. Ask him to support election security action and to pressure Mitch McConnell to allow votes on the election-security legislation passed by the House.
Here is Tammy Baldwin’s contact page. Thank her for supporting election-security legislation.

Wisconsin has paper ballots, but our election results are not secure. Our county clerks do not use those paper ballots to verify the Election-Night results before they certify the final results. Several other states don’t even have paper ballots. That threatens us all.

The risks are real. Evidence is overwhelming. In 2016, Russian operatives hacked and probed American political campaigns and voter registration systems. But Russia isn’t the only problem–maybe not even the worst. Why would it be? American elections are an attractive target for many around the world and in our own country.  Hackers in China and Iran are showing interest and have launched thousands of attacks not just in the U.S., but in 26 countries, according to Microsoft, which has been helping detect and deter attacks for democracy-supporting organizations of all stripes. 

Many in the US Congress appreciate the need for REAL election security–and NOW. The House of Representatives has passed federal legislation that would make it possible for every state to have:
1) A voter-verified paper ballot for every vote; and
2) Robust ​manual​ election​ ​audits that detect and correct any false outcomes before election results are declared final.

But the US Senate isn’t working.

The House passed $600 million (in H.R. 3351) in election security funding for states and localities to use to secure our vote. While Republicans and Democrats had different proposals, nearly every representative in both parties voted to designated hundreds of millions of dollars for election security. Now it’s time for the Senate to write and pass its funding proposal.

But Mitch McConnell said. “I’m not going to do that.” He and his obedient cronies are blocking the legislation that would allow the states to protect our federal elections in 2020.

Every single U.S. Senator must stand up for democracy now. The Senate must pass funding for election security. They must include the House bill language so that the counties that are the most vulnerable are able to get the funds they need to secure our elections for all. 

The House voted to provide the states with funding for:

  • Paper Records: Every voter can ​​mark​ ​a paper​ ​ballot​ by hand or with an assistive device and verify their vote, so that there is a paper record of every vote cast.
  • Checking the Results: Officials subject ​machine-counted​ ​results​​ to​ a robust ​manual​ ​post-election​ ​audit,​ that can detect and correct false outcomes.
  • Secure Voter Data: Voter databases should be backed up offline, monitored and secured using best practices. Poll workers should be trained to ensure that voters can cast a vote in case of a hack or error.
  • Election websites and election management systems, as well as the vendors themselves also need to be more secure and resilient in the face of possible hacking attempts and computer error. 

FAQ

Q: To what extent can Mitch McConnell hold up the funding?
McConnell can fully block the funding if he wants to. But his spokesperson recently said they have not ruled out an appropriation for election security so national election-security advovates believe there is an opening. At the end of September the government must be funded so the Senate either must pass appropriations bills or agree to a continuing resolution with the House leadership. In either case, $600 million in election security funding for states and localities can and should be included.

Q: Isn’t this a federal mandate on state elections? 
States and localities have been pleading for funding from Congress for years now, and every state wants to be able to secure its elections. The House passed a strong bill with $600 million requiring the funding be spent on the areas of greatest vulnerabilities.

Q: The states got $380 million for election security in 2018 and they haven’t spent it all. Shouldn’t we wait until should spend it before getting more money.
States and counties are spending down the funds, they expect to spend 85% of the funds by the 2020 election. But in too many places it wasn’t enough to do a lot of the serious work. We want them to proceed quickly, but carefully so they actually are able to use the funds to make our elections more secure.

Q: My election official says the voting machines are not connected to the internet, how can they be hacked?
Sadly, our local election officials cannot promise that–they simply cannot know. They don’t have control over the security of the voting-machine manufacturers, where the software is developed. Election officials have no way to know whether those companies’ computers are on or off line. And if the software has been compromised before it even reaches the local officials, it doesn’t matter whether the local clerk keeps it secure.

In addition, it’s just not true that the voting machines are never connected to the internet. Local election officials often don’t understand what the voting machines are doing when they transmit results on Election Night. Almost all of our voting machines and the county elections computers use the internet during pre-election tests and then again for election-night reporting of the results. And on top of that, national cybersecurity sleuths recently found that nine Wisconsin counties had left their county elections computers on line continuously for as much as a year!

Q: We already have paper ballots, what do we need this funding for?
Paper ballots are only decorative if no one ever uses them to verify the voting machines’ accuracy. As things now stand, after a Wisconsin voter casts his or her ballot, chances are it will never be looked at again. It will be sealed up on Election Night and will stay sealed until it is destroyed two years later. In the meantime, the voting-machine tape will be assumed to be correct.

Unless the paper ballots are used in rigorous post-election audits comparing the votes on the paper with the numbers the machine reported, we can’t know for sure if the outcome of the election was correct.

The one huge hole in Wisconsin’s election security is that our officials do not routinely audit the results. The state elections agency could use this money to fund efforts to develop practical, reliable audit practices that fit with Wisconsin’s unique election-administration practices.

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